Meet the King of Cats in person at Franklin Park Zoo, then see him in his natural habitat in Lions 3D at the Aquarium's IMAX theatre

Click image for hi-res version

Christopher, the 405-pound adult

Christopher, the 405-pound adult
male lion at Franklin Park Zoo's
Kalahari Kingdom.

Photo: Zoo New England

Boston, MA - January 26, 2007
As the cold finally descends this winter, take the closest thing to an African savannah safari without the danger of getting eaten: A Day of Lions at Franklin Park Zoo and New England Aquarium. Spend a morning or early afternoon in person with the King of the Kalahari Desert at Franklin Park Zoo, then journey to his natural habitat with the giant-screen 3D IMAX film Lions 3D on New England’s largest movie screen at the Aquarium’s Simons IMAX Theatre.

Come face-to-face with Christopher, a 405-pound adult male African lion in Franklin Park Zoo’s Kalahari Kingdom and experience the most fearsome of the world’s big cats. Climb into a viewing station in a “crashed” Land Rover and watch as he sniffs around the hood, exchange glances through glass at a ranger station or listen to his famous roars that can be heard throughout the zoo.

After exploring Franklin Park Zoo, move on to the Aquarium’s Simons IMAX Theatre for Lions 3D, a spectacular real-life Lion King in full 3D on the largest movie screen in New England. Lions 3D tells the story of a powerful but aging male who rules a water hole in Botswana’s Kalahari Desert—“a precious pearl of water in a world of thirst.” When a younger rival challenges his rule, the fates of the king’s lionesses, their cubs, and all other residents of this arid land hang in the balance. This intimate portrait uses IMAX 3D technology to bring these lions, their prey and their battles so close that viewers feel like they could reach out and touch them—closer even than on an actual safari.

The roar of an adult male African lion may be the only thing as impressive as the sight of him. “The lion’s roar is one of the most powerful sounds in nature,” said Lions 3D director Tim Liversedge. “[I]t can be heard from five miles away, and, from close range, will actually shake a Land Rover on its springs.” It takes a special sound system to recreate this incredible noise, but a 12,000 watt, 44-speaker setup designed for the sound of a space shuttle launch means the Simons IMAX Theatre is equal to the task.

A Day of Lions takes place at Boston’s Franklin Park Zoo and the New England Aquarium’s Simons IMAX Theatre beginning January 26, when Lions 3D opens. Winter admission to Franklin Park Zoo is as follows: Adults, $9.50; Seniors over 62, $8; Children ages 2-12, $5.50. Bring your Franklin Park Zoo admission receipt or members’ pass to the Simons IMAX Theatre to receive the following discounted admission rates to Lions 3D: Adults, $7.95; Children ages 3-11, $5.95. Franklin Park Zoo is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, or in case of inclement weather call (617) 541-5466. Call (617) 973-5200 for movie showtimes, or check the Aquarium website at www.newenglandaquarium.org. Lions 3D will show through June of 2007, so experience A Day of Lions while you can!

About Franklin Park Zoo

Franklin Park Zoo, founded in 1913, is the 72-acre site nestled in Boston’s historic Franklin Park, long considered the “crown jewel” of Frederick Law Olmsted’s Emerald Necklace Park System. Highlights of Franklin Park Zoo’s collection include the African lion of the Kalahari Kingdom, Masai giraffe and Grevy’s zebra of the Giraffe Savannah, Tiger Tales, featuring a Bengal mix and white tiger, and the signature Tropical Forest. For more information about Franklin Park Zoo, visit www.franklinparkzoo.org

About the New England Aquarium

Located on the Boston waterfront, the New England Aquarium is one of the most prominent and popular aquariums in the United States. Its mission is “to present, promote and protect the world of water.” Beyond its exhibit halls, the Aquarium is also a leading ocean conservation organization with research scientists working around the globe and biologists rescuing stranded marine animals in New England.