The Aquarium never seems to be at a loss for jellies. In fact, we are one of the most extensive culturing program in the United States! Our species range from lagoon jelly, starting at 4 inches in diameter, all the way to some species of sea nettle with a diameter more than 17 inches and a length from its mouth to its arms at 12 to 15 feet long! 
Take a look at the beauty and diversity of species you can see at the Aquarium.

Jellies at the New England Aquarium

Most of sea jellies exhibits can be found on the lower level of the Aquarium, past the Shark & Ray Touch Tank and down the stairs on your way to the Sea Turtle Hospital. Here are some facts on a few of the jellies you can discover right now at the New England Aquarium!

mediterranean jelly

Mediterranean Jelly



Diet: 
food produced by tiny plants called zooxanthellae; zooplankton
Size:
 diameter to 13 inches (33 cm)
Habitat: 
open waters
Range:
 Mediterranean Sea, coastal lagoons

moon jellies

Moon Jelly



Diet:
 small plankton, like molluscs, crustaceans, fish eggs, and other small jellies
Size: 
to 15 inches (38 cm) in diameter
Habitat: 
open waters
Range:
 common in Monterey Bay and along the California coast, and in the

sea nettle

Sea Nettle



Diet: 
young pollock, larval fishes, zooplankton, other jellies
Size: 
bell to approximately 17.7 inches (45 cm) in diameter, mouth-arms 12 to 15 feet (3.6 to 4.6 m) long
Habitat:
 open waters
Range: 
coastal waters off Alaska to California, Japan, Kamchatka, the Aleutian Islands and the Bering Sea

lagoon jelly

Lagoon Jelly



Diet:
 food produced by tiny plants called zooxanthellae; zooplankton

Size:
 average size is 4 inches (10 cm) in diameter, but can grow to about 12 inches (30 cm)
Relatives: 
blue jelly; Family: Magistiidae
Habitat:
 coastal waters
Range:
 South Pacific Ocean, Hawaii and Puerto Rico

Jellies in the News

Our Curator of Fishes Steve Bailey and Senior Aquarist Chris Doller brought PBS News Hour Correspondent Miles O’Brien behind the scenes to see where we culture jellies. Watch the long-form segment on these brainless, boneless beauties and learn how they’re surviving in our changing oceans.

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