Kleenex

(Catalog No. 1142)
Kleenex is one of the most productive females in the catalog, with at least seven calves born to her thus far—in 1977, 1981, 1984, 1990, 1996, 2001 and 2005 (link to family tree). Of the five right whale critical habitats (or conservation zones) (link to habitat maps), she has been seen in all but Cape Cod Bay....More

Kleenex's family tree (pdf, 13.9mb)

No. 1412
Scott Marion
New England Aquarium

No. 1412

(Catalog No. 1412)
Right whale No. 1412 is one of the most mysterious in the population—so much so that she doesn’t have a name. She has very few sightings in the catalog, but the few times she has been seen have been very intriguing....More

Porter

Porter
Karl-Otto Jacobsen
Division of Arctic Ecology–Norway

(Catalog No. 1133)
Porter is a big adult male that we have been following for years. He has been seen every year or two since his first sighting in 1981. He has a very distinctive scar on his left shoulder that makes him easy to recognize. In 1999, Porter made the longest documented journey of any right whale....More

Wart

Wart
Monica Zani
New England Aquarium

(Catalog No. 1140)
“Wart,” is one of the more productive females in the catalog. She has given birth to at least 6 calves since her first sighting in 1981 (in 1982, 1987, 1990, 1994, 2001 and 2005). Wart is one of the right whales that helped scientist begin to grasp just how far a right whale can travel in a relatively short amount of time....More

Wart's family tree (pdf, 4.5mb)