Shrimp are farmed in many different countries around the world using different farming techniques. US farmed shrimp is an ocean-friendly seafood option because they can be farmed in ways that have little negative impact on the environment. Shrimp are the most commonly consumed seafood item in the United States and their sweet, mild flavor and firm texture holds up to almost any cooking style from boiling to grilling.

 

Also known as:

Shrimp, white shrimp, prawns, ebi

Availability:

Year-round

Product forms:

Fresh or frozen, head-on or head-off
Shopping tips: Most shrimp on the market are either wild-caught or imported farmed shrimp. Be sure to ask your fish monger or grocer specifically for US farm-raised shrimp. Also try ordering direct from the farm websites.

Substitutions:

 
Recipe: Creamy shrimp soup
US Shrimp farming: US shrimp farms are generally located away from the coast in land based earth ponds or concrete tanks called raceways. More.

Conservation notes:

U.S. farmed shrimp are an ocean-friendly seafood choice because farming techniques have little negative impact on the local environment. More.

Last updated: June 2010

US Shrimp Farming

US farmed raised shrimp are an ocean-friendly choice because shrimp farming generally occurs in areas that are away from sensitive coastal regions. Shrimp fry (baby shrimp) are raised in hatcheries and transferred to tanks or ponds until they reach market size. Tanks or ponds are made of compacted dirt or concrete reducing the risk of salty water mixing with fresh groundwater beneath the farms. Water use is kept to a minimum because most US farms re-use water by circulating it through the tanks. The types of farms used in the US for shrimp also allows for extra waste and unwanted nutrients to be filtered out rather than being released into the environment.

 

Conservation Notes

US farmed shrimp are an ocean-friendly seafood choice because farming techniques have little negative impact on the local environment. Most US shrimp farms are located away from the coast and are highly regulated and therefore the potential to damage sensitive ecosystems such as mangroves or release untreated pollution into natural water bodies is minimized. Re-circulating, closed systems such as those commonly used for shrimp culture in the US reduces environmental impact because farms have limited contact with the natural ecosystem. US shrimp production methods can reduce or eliminate the need for antibiotics or chemicals to control disease. Waste can also be filtered out and these nutrients can then be reused as fertilizer for other crops.